Lemon Meringue Cups

When going through my pantry to see how well I’ve stocked up on certain things (so I could plan my supermarket COVID-19 strategy), I spied a can of sweetened condensed milk that admittedly I’d forgotten about. Conveniently enough I had some beautiful lemons from a friend (from her sister’s lemon tree), and some eggs, so it was time to whip up some lemon meringue cups!

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Glühwein

Like many people, I have a big notebook of recipes that I’ve tinkered with over time. I’ve hardly looked at it the past few years, actually, having more recipes online somewhere, but if I’m going to be indoors social distancing because of COVID-19, I figured I may as well go through them and post the ones I want to keep. First up…Glühwein!

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Marzipan Raspberry Cream Cake

Eberhardinentorte, specialty at Schloss Pretzsch

I don’t make a lot of cakes. But for awhile now I’d been kicking around wanting to make a scrumptious cake similar to one I had in Germany in 2018, the Eberhardinentorte in the little cafe at Schloss Pretzsch. It’s basically a lovely cream-filled layer cake, with a deep red (marzipan?) smooth coating, and edible gold leaf on the side. They don’t give out the recipe, and I couldn’t find one online, so the search was on.

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Pastel de Choclo

Pastel de choclo is a traditional and popular dish in Chile. We saw references to it on our first trip to Chile in 2014, but didn’t actually try it until 2017 when we figured out what it was 🙂 and again in 2020. It is basically a hearty beef casserole with a variety of add-ins – cooked chicken, hard-boiled eggs, raisins, olives – with a creamed corn topping. Some call it the Chilean shepherd’s pie; I call it yummy Chilean comfort food.

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Leberwurst (Chicken Liver Pate)

I have to admit, I love a good liverwurst. It might provoke a few “icks” out of people but once you’ve tasted a really good one, you want more! One of my favorites was a chunky homemade version from a local German deli. I also had some pretty good store-bought liverwurst recently in Puerto Varas, Chile – no doubt because of the German influence in the area. After that trip, as I contemplated making some Chilean cuisine (pastel de choclo coming soon!), I decided to get busy and make myself some leberwurst.

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Eating Across Chile and Argentina (2020)

In January 2020 we returned to Chile, to escape winter and to do some birding and cycling. We also had a few days at the end in Mendoza, Argentina, for some wine tasting. The “escape winter” part of the trip was negated by the fact that it rained the whole first week in the lakes district around Puerto Varas, and then we went to southern Patagonia (Tierra del Fuego, Torres del Paine) – Mark Twain’s old line “the coldest winter I ever spent was summer in San Francisco” was definitely adaptable to that locale. But that didn’t keep us from eating and drinking well!

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Koeksisters

We sampled koeksisters – a very sweet syrup-soaked fried doughnut – at the Rose Cottage B&B in Dullstroom, South Africa (or more accurately, at the bakery shop where one checks into the B&B). They’re reminiscent of a French cruller in that they have a nice spiral twisted shape to them, and they’re deep-fried, but they’re traditionally made with baking powder and soaked in heavy syrup vs. getting a simple glaze. The appeal of a koeksister is that it is a little crunchy outside, and soft/syrupy inside. And did I mention sweet?

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Bunny Chow

Bunny chow, or simply a bunny, is a South African fast food dish consisting of an Indian spicy curry served in a hollowed out loaf of bread. According to Madhur Jaffrey, it ultimately originated among Indian South Africans in Durban, although it is widely available throughout the country. At my niece Rachel’s suggestion, I hoped to have one while in South Africa recently, but didn’t manage to do so. I figured I’d do the next best thing and make it at home. Can’t make any claims as to authenticity as I didn’t have one there, but it’s pretty darn good.

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Peri Peri Sauce

20190403_141515_smWe were introduced to the joys of peri peri sauce in South Africa. Peri peri or piri piri (depending on where you are) is the name used in Portuguese and a number of African languages to describe the diminutive African bird’s-eye chili. The variations in spelling derive from the various pronunciations of the word in parts of Africa, although ‘piri-piri’ is the correct spelling in Portuguese. Peri or piri simply means pepper; saying it twice, you get the idea that it’s hot.

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